Western Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly

Western Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly

  • Butterfly: Western tiger swallowtail (Papilio rutulus)
  • Description: Yellow with black stripes. Blue and orange spots near the tail. Tails on hind wings.
  • Locations: urban parks, gardens, rural woodlands
  • Wingspan: 7-10 centimeters
  • Host Plants: Cottonwood Tree, Willow Tree, Aspen Tree (quaking aspen, trembling aspen, quakies)

Western Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly Photo Gallery

Western Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly
Western Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly

Western Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly Host Plant: Cottonwood Tree
Cottonwood Tree

Western Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly Host Plant: Willow Tree
Willow Tree

Western Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly Host Plant: Aspen Tree
Aspen Tree

Viceroy Butterfly

Viceroy Butterfly

  • Butterfly: Viceroy Butterfly (Limenitis archippus)
  • Description: Orange and black wings. Mimic of Monarch.
  • Locations: wooded areas, city parts, free spaces
  • Wingspan: 53-81 mm
  • Flight: Diurnal – late morning, early afternoon
  • Nectar Sources: Plum Tree, Cherry Tree
  • Host Plants: Willow Tree, Poplar Tree, Cottonwood Tree

Viceroy Butterfly Photo Gallery

Viceroy Butterfly
Viceroy Butterfly

Viceroy Butterfly Nectar Source : Plum Tree
Plum Tree

Viceroy Butterfly Nectar Source : Cherry Tree
Cherry Tree

Viceroy Butterfly Caterpillar
Viceroy Butterfly Caterpillar

Viceroy Butterfly Caterpillar Host Plant : Willow Tree
Willow Tree

Viceroy Butterfly Caterpillar Host Plant : Poplar Tree
Poplar Tree

Viceroy Butterfly Caterpillar Host Plant : Cottonwood Tree
Cottonwood Tree

Viceroy Butterfly Pupa
Viceroy Butterfly Pupa

Lorquin’s Admiral Butterfly

Lorquin's Admiral Butterfly
The Lorquin’s Admiral (Limenitis lorquini) is a butterfly from the Nymphalinae subfamily. The butterfly is named after Pierre Joseph Michel Lorquin, a French naturalist that came to California from France during the Gold Rush and made important discoveries on the natural history of the terrain. Lorquin’s Admiral Butterfly Physical description
The Lorquin’s Admiral has brown-black wings, each with a row of white spots across the wings and orange colored tips. Wingspan: 47 to 71 mm though females are generally larger than males. Lorquin’s Admiral Butterfly Habitat
The Lorquin’s Admiral can mostly be found across Upper Sonoran to the Canadian Zone, east to western Montana and Idaho. Known areas include southern British Columbia (including Vancouver Island, north of Emerald Lake), Cypress Hills in southwestern Saskatchewan as well as southwestern Alberta.The butterfly resides mostly in forest edges, mountain canyons, parks, streamsides, fencerows, orchards, and groves of cottonwood and poplar. Usually the butterflies feed on California buckeye, yerba santa, privet, bird droppings, and dung. It is extremely territorial and will attack any intruders to its habitat, including large birds. Lorquin’s Admiral Butterfly Larva
The Lorquin’s Admiral larva are usually yellow along with a patch of white on its back. They are laid near or on the tips of leaves. Common trees that the larva feed on include willow (Salix), poplar, wild cherry (Prunus), cottonwood (Populus), and an assortment of orchard trees including that of cherry, apple, and plum. Lorquin’s Admiral Butterfly Flight season
The Lorquin’s Admiral usually flies around April to October, though it depends on the region. Butterflies found in northern areas tend to fly once (usually between June and August) whereas southern butterflies (mainly in California) tend to fly multiple times. Lorquin’s Admiral Butterfly Similar species
* White Admiral (L. arthemis’)
* Weidemeyer’s Admiral (L. weidemeyerii)
* California Sister Butterfly (Adelpha bredowii californica)

Source: Wikipedia

     Lorquin’s Admiral Butterfly Food:
Buckeye Tree (California Buckeye)
Buckeye Tree
Yerba Santa
Yerba Santa
Privet, Bird Droppings, Dung

Lorquin’s Admiral Butterfly
: Buckeye Tree (California Buckeye), Yerba Santa, Privet, Bird Droppings, Dung.
Host Plants: Willow Tree, Poplar Tree, Apple Tree, Plum Tree, Cherry Tree, Cottonwood Tree, Willow Tree.
     Region 1: Oregon, Washington, Southern British Columbia.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly
The Eastern Tiger Swallowtail (Papilio glaucus) is a large (12 cm wingspan) swallowtail butterfly. It is found in the Eastern United States, as far north as southern Vermont, and as far West as extreme Eastern Colorado. It flies from spring through fall, and most of the year in the southern portions of its range, where it may produce two or three broods a year. In the Appalachian region, it is replaced by the closely-related and only recently described larger-sized Papilio appalachiensis, and in the north, it is replaced by the closely-related Papilio canadensis. These three species can be very difficult to distinguish, and were formerly all considered to be a single species.

Adult males are yellow, with four black “tiger stripes” on each fore wing. The trailing edges of the fore and hind wings are black which is broken with yellow spots. On the medial margin of the hind wing next to the abdomen there are small red and blue spots.

There are two morphs of adult females, a yellow and a dark one. The yellow morph is similar to the male, except that the hind wings have an area of blue between the black margin and the main yellow area. In the dark morph, most of the yellow areas are replaced with a dark gray to a black. A shadow of the “tiger stripes” can still be seen on the dark females. The dark form is more common in the Southern portions of the range, especially in areas also inhabited by the poisonous Pipevine swallowtail, which it seems to mimic.

Eastern Tiger Swallowtails often rest with their wings fully spread, particularly if the sun is out.

Female lays spherical green eggs on the top of leaves of host plants. After hatching, the caterpillars often eat the shell of their egg. The first instars are dark and mimic bird droppings. The second and third instars use mimicry camouflage to the extreme. Lying quietly on a branch or leaf the caterpillar appears to be a piece of bird excrement but if disturbed rears its head and acts like an aggressive snake similar to the Hognose Snake. If disturbed enough, it will extend two red horns known as osmeterium from its underside that look like a snake’s tongue. This fearsome visual disguise is often enough to frighten or fool a curious bird or predator. The larvae eat the leaves of a wide variety of trees and shrubs, including cottonwood, tulip tree, sweet bay, Lemon and cherry. Adults are strictly diurnal; they start to fly towards noon and by and by return to rest throughout the afternoon (Fullard & Napoleone 2001).

State butterfly status

The Eastern tiger swallowtail is the state butterfly of Georgia, Virginia, Alabama, South Carolina and Delaware.

Source: Wikipedia      Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly Nectar Sources:
Cherry Tree
Cherry Tree
Poplar Tree
Poplar
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly Caterpillar
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly
     Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly Caterpillar Host Plants:
Cottonwood Tree
Cottonwood Tree
Tulip Tree
Tulip Tree
Sweet Bay Tree
Sweet Bay Tree
Lemon Tree
Lemon Tree
Cherry Tree
Cherry Tree
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly Eggs
Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Eggs

Eastern Tiger Swallowtail Butterfly
: Cherry Tree, Poplar Tree.
Host Plants: Cottonwood Tree, Tulip Tree, Sweet Bay Tree, Lemon Tree, Cherry Tree.
    
Region 6: Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia.
    
Region 7: Connecticut, Delaware, Indiana, Maine, Maryland, Massachusetts, Michigan, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Washington, DC , West Virginia, Southern Ontario, Southern Quebec.